Transport of batteries

DEKRA expert tip

Even standard car batteries entail a certain risk during shipment and transport due to a possible acid leak or short circuit.

Workshops and dealers must therefore pay attention to a couple of things when handling and transporting them.

Due to the high energy density, however, lithium-ion batteries are also finding increased use in vehicles. On the one hand, many premium car manufacturers are now replacing regular starter batteries with lithium batteries. And on the other hand, electromobility is playing an ever-growing role in workshops. This trend is affecting not only motor vehicle workshops, though. The growing popularity of e-bikes and pedelecs has led to many bicycle workshops also being confronted with the topic of lithium batteries.

International transport law classifies lithium-ion batteries as a hazardous material, meaning they need to meet a wide array of requirements in order to be transported.

International transport law classifies lithium-ion batteries as a hazardous material, meaning they need to meet a wide array of requirements in order to be transported. A distinction is made here between lithium-ion batteries with less than 100 Wh, which are covered by a special regulation in the legislation on the transport of hazardous materials providing for more lax transportation conditions, and batteries with more than 100 Wh. But even batteries of bicycles with an electric auxiliary motor, often these are pedelecs, store high amounts of energy. This means the even e-bike workshops are forced to look for a service provider that can help them meet the legal requirements for transporting what is legally speaking a hazardous material. This already begins with the packaging, meaning, for example, that only a person instructed on the legal requirements for the transport of hazardous materials can package lithium batteries and prepare them for shipment.

One important aspect in this is the ability to decide whether the battery can be transported or not. This is important e.g. in the case of batteries damaged in an accident, or in the case of returns from customers due to a complaint, since defective batteries may under certain circumstances heat up and even cause a fire. In such cases, the specialist entrusted with transporting the batteries needs to decide what measures are to be taken to be able to transport the goods, or whether they cannot be transported at all. Depending on the number and scope of the transports, it is also required that a hazardous materials officer be appointed who is responsible for the safe and correct execution of the transport assignment.

DEKRA offers consulting and training in this regard in order to ensure a safe, hazard-free transport of batteries between the manufacturer, retailer, workshop, and disposal company. It is also possible to appoint an external hazardous materials officer. This offer is aimed at vehicle manufacturers, suppliers and workshops active in all sectors, from e-bikes to commercial vehicles.

Contact

Thomas  Schneider

Thomas  Schneider

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+49.711.7861-3738
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DEKRA Automobil GmbH

Handwerkstraße 15

70565 Stuttgart

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